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The premise of minimum wage, when it was introduced, was that a single wage earner should be able to own a home and support a family.  That was what it was based on; a full time job, any job, should be able to accomplish this.

The fact people scoff at this idea if presented nowadays, as though the people that ring up your groceries or hand you your burgers don’t deserve the luxury of a home and a family, is disgusting.

(via christiancgtomas)

Source: detrea
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  1. Your real name:
    Ricky
  2. your detective name (favourite colour and favourite animal):
    Green Manta
  3. your soap opera name (middle name and street you live on):
    Morris Baronne
  4. your star wars name (first three letters of last name, first two of middle): 
    Rinmo
  5. superhero name (color of your shirt, first item to your immediate left): 
    Purple Case
  6. goth name (black and one of your pets): 
    Black Archie

(via lupified)

Source: peacefulfrom1353
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skottieyoung:

One picture to disprove all this nonsense that cosplayers are hurting us and cons.

(via samhumphries)

Source: skottieyoung
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redhairandabluebox:

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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I keep seeing more of these and they’re all so freakin’ awesome.

(via samiholloway)

Source: nofreedomlove
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frankoceanfanclub:

Yeah it’s pretty fucked up how people don’t realize that ideas like oh he doesn’t speak English well = he’s st*pid are inherently racist and were pioneered by racists to ensure separation in academic and professional field. The way you speak English will never be an indicator of your intelligence ever

(via christiancgtomas)

Source: frankoceanfanclub
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sourcedumal:

xxvalleygirlxx:

Kristen Stewart, Zooey Deschanel, Jennifer Aniston, Katherine Heigl, Blake Lively and a whole flurry of mediocre white actresses (who btw play the same roles OVER AND OVER) are always offered roles. Meanwhile, Oscar nominated/winning black actresses (who have won other awards prestigious as well) are struggling to remain relevant. Just because there are a lot of black led TV shows coming this fall, that doesn’t mean the struggle is over or lessening. Many of these actresses have had to move onto TV roles or do both because they haven’t been offered enough (or appropriate) roles. 

Chile

But white folks too quick to say we have ‘enough’ roles for Black folks in media…

This is important. I remember Viola Davis in Doubt. She was on screen for two minutes and clearly was the best part of the movie. Because of her I saw The Help. Those top three actresses are very talented, and it is a shame. If I were to make a movie, I’d have few to no white people. I see these movies all the time and even the extras are all white. And why yes, I know for a fact there are some small towns with entirely white populations, in general, it’s not reality. My hometown if New Orleans, for example is mostly populated by people of color. Yet New Orleans is rarely portrayed that way. Look at the mostly white cast of American Horror Story.

(via christiancgtomas)

Source: shady-heaux
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kierongillen:

spankbutts:

"The laws of physics can kiss my ass."

 America Chavez - Young Avengers 

This is my first serious cosplay. I loved her character so much, I think I decided I was going to cosplay her within the first few pages of the comic. She’s just that kickass,

and I did enjoy being able to wear my hair all natural for this :) 

This is a fantastic America.

Source: spankbutts
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I realised that the scariest movie villains are all women. I wonder what that says about me.

In case you want to know who they are in order from least scary to most

6. Pageant Official Jenkins from Little Miss Sunshine (Beth Grant)
5. Chastity Pariah from Elvira: Mistress of the Dark (Edie McClurg)
4. Baroness Rodmilla de Ghent from Ever After (Anjelica Huston)
3. Dr. Pinder-Schloss from The Addams Family (Elizabeth Wilson)
2. Dolores Umbridge from Harry Potter (Imelda Staunton)
1. Miranda Priestly from The Devil Wears Prada (Meryl Streep)

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So I’m reading Black Widow, and I stupidly thought that it’d get better after the author liked my criticism of his work on tumblr. But he’s still getting paid, because I’m still buying it (but I’m going to stop after issue 12 so then I can buy the collected editions instead because I’m a budget masochist. But I’m still holding out. She’s so uptight, but I’m pretty sure that later on we find out that on weekends she’s a magician’s assistant. And for the two of you who will understand that reference, you’re welcome.